You can’t see White, if you won’t see Black

Currently showing at the National Art Glass Gallery, in Wagga Wagga: a very cool exhibition of works selected from the Collection. Ordinarily we’d encourage a road trip, but given the current barricades (aka the ever-shifting regional covid lockdowns) it’s sadly become a persistently ‘yeah-but-no-but’ proposition.

Still, never say never – we may yet get a clear path, fingers crossed, for a lightening dash across the mountains before close-of-show on the 5th December (perennial optimists that we are)…

Image: Megan Bottari, Post-Modern Tokenism III 2007-2013 (detail) lost wax cast lead crystal.

Gallery statement:

Curated from the National Art Glass Collection, You can’t see White, if you won’t see Black seeks to comment on the coexistence and unity of opposites as well as duality in politics, spirituality and morality.

Day, light, and good are often linked together, in opposition to night, darkness, and evil. These contrasting metaphors represented as White and Black go back in human history, and across cultures, including in the Judeo-Christian tradition, ancient Chinese Yin and Yang and ancient Persia.

As seen in this exhibition, the use of black and white creates a focused attention upon content, form, pattern, texture or upon the way in which the object has been made. Glass itself presents as a particularly expressive medium to explore abstract ideas. Both solid and fluid, glass absorbs and refracts light, and in so doing communicates spiritual purity and intensity of feeling, such as the oneness of the universe might be felt.

Showtime: Saturday 24 July – Sunday 5 December | National Art Glass Gallery

Nota Bene: shameless self-promotion alert! Megsie is in the show.

Catch up…

Very late mail on the Tom Malone Prize (we’ve been a tad distracted) but just wanted to send a big congrats to winner Mark Eliot for his fabulous piece…

tom_malone_prize_mark_eliott.Mark Eliott, Down at the water table, 2018, borosilicate glass – blown and hot sculpted, recycled Australian Red Cedar, water, 58 x 69 x 16cm. Photograph: Richard Weinstein

‘It all started down at the local (where else?), after a solid rain. We were having a good natter over a drink when we accidentally bumped branches under the table. Next thing mycorrhizal fungi connected and it was all on for young and old. Since reading Peter Wohlleben’s The hidden life of trees, I am no longer able to see these organisms merely as chunks of wood with bark and leaves on, but as entities with some kind of undeniable intelligence and character. Instead I now commit the different sin of anthropomorphising them. In this 3D cartoon the human/canine story is incidental while the trees take centre stage.’

Very cool. Ticks all our boxes; topical, humorous, beautifully made. Totes deserving of the win.

Meanwhile, we also really like Jeremy’s work (notwithstanding that it’s at the polar opposite end of the aesthetic range!)…

 

Tom Malone Prize 2019_Jeremy Lepisto_360x360 Jeremy Lepisto, Structure 2 (from the Aspect series) 2018, kiln formed and fabricated glass, 25.2 x.25.2 x 25.2. Photograph: Rob Little

 

For the full story/field of finalists go to the Art Gallery of Western Australia’s Tom Malone 2019 announcement, here

 

[…we’re heading straight out to share a bevie with our trees. (n)Ed.]